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The Freshmen 8! Sleep Challenge

The first study tip for the year has nothing to do with studying at all! In the study cited by the Huffington Post in the article below they found:

  • "In a study of short sleepers (less than six hours); average sleepers (six to eight hours); and long sleepers (eight-plus hours) ... the long sleepers had the highest GPAs.
  • Then in 2007 researchers looked at what type of sleeper got better grades: A "morning person" or a "night owl." What they discovered: an extreme night owl would have an average GPA of about 2.5 and, as each person became more and more of an early bird, their GPAs increased all the way to a 3.5.
  • This year, researchers discovered that nearly a third of college students surveyed at least one sleep disorder. These researchers found that students without sleep disorders had a higher GPA than those with sleep disorders. GPA scores lower than 2.00 were more likely to be those of students with at least one sleep disorder."

Personally, I have seen this affect my own grades. During my third year, I began to prioritize sleep and saw a significant improvement in my grades as well as my energy and attitude. The next time you have to choose between cramming all night and getting your sleep, I challenge you to choose sleep! 

Check out the full story below:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-michael-j-breus/the-freshman-8-and-your-g_b_703155.html

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